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Hi,
If you spend a lot of time in the DA forums, you will see this topic spring up again and again. Whether you want to earn a living doing freelance art, or you just want to do an occasional commission, the following guidelines may help you. For the purposes of this journal I'm going to assume that you developed sufficient skill for potential clients to want to purchase your work. If that is not the case, then get back to studying and practicing :)

1) Why is it so difficult to choose a price? Why can't someone look at my art and tell me what to charge? Because your ability to sell something is not just a matter of assigning a price based on your skill level! If three people can draw the same drawing with the same level of skill, one might be able to sell the art for $10, another might be able to sell the art for $100 and the third might not be able to sell it at all depending on how good they are at "marketing" (seeking out or attracting the best clients and convincing them to buy from you). An artist's ability to seek out clients, choose the right clients, offer a type of work that will sell for a good price, communicate effectively, and provide value that their competitors cannot match... is difficult to gauge by looking at a few art samples.

2) The starting price you pick right now doesn't have to be the perfect price. You can change it in a week or a month. The important thing is to get started with the process of selling your art. Sell some art then re-evaluate your prices. If art is going to be a career for you, through trial, error, research and skill building, you will probably want to figure out the highest reasonable amount you can charge while still providing a good value to the client so that you get more business.

3)
As an artist, you will find that you can increase your prices if you:
3a) improve your art skills
3b) improve your gallery or portfolio
3c) find clients who are willing to spend more than other clients
3d) improve your ability to convince more clients to buy from you instead of someone else.
3e) offer a product or service that is of a higher quality, harder to find, or of more importance or value to potential clients so you can increase your prices
3f) learn to pick reliable clients who pay promptly and don't require a lot of revisions
3g) clearly describe the work you will provide and then deliver it on time
3h) develop a reputation as someone who is professional, pleasant, reliable and easy to work with
3i) consistently attract enough clients that it won't matter if you lose a few when your prices go up.



4) "Find a starting price"
(Very experienced artists may be able to charge a lot more than beginners because of their skill level, notoriety, or other factors)
For anyone new to freelancing (again assuming that your art is good enough to attract clients), a pretty common way to estimate your price for a piece of art is to pick an hourly rate and multiply that by the (approximate) number of hours that it will take you to complete the art. The number of hours you estimate for the work may just be rough guess, but you will get better at approximating as you complete more and more work. If you are just starting out with freelancing, and you plan to eventually earn a living with art, you should charge at least minimum wage. (Otherwise you might as well get a regular job that doesn't require any special skills!)  If you are selling art online or to clients in a particular part of the world, you can probably use the minimum wage rate where the client lives as a starting point (or you can use the minimum wage in your area of the world, or average the two values...). If you KNOW you can charge more than that, do it. Also include the value of any materials used up in the process and the shipping cost if you are mailing a physical piece of art to a client. You can get approximate mailing prices by visiting the website of your post office (in the USA it is postcalc.usps.com/ ).

As I said before, it is not important to figure the exact "right" starting price. You just need to estimate a price, and start trying to sell your work, then adjust your price or your skill level or your selling methods, to find a combination that works for you.

If you can't get people to pay at least "minimum wage" , don't just keep lowering your prices toward zero... instead, improve your art skills and job seeking behaviors to accommodate a reasonable price.
4a) improve your art skills,
4b) improve the appearance of your portfolio/profile,
4c) improve the way you find and apply for jobs,
4d) seek better clients or possibly
4e) provide a different type of art that has less competition or a higher demand.
The more you work, the more you will build up the confidence to insist on a decent pay rate. If you are pretty good, and you work hard, and learn to market yourself, then at some point you will have more job offers than you can handle.

5) Increasing your prices!
If you are able to bring as much work as you can handle, you may be able to increase your price. If you are well known, you may be able to increase your price. If you have very little competition for a particular job, you may be able to increase your price. If you are more skilled than your competition you may be able to increase your price. If your client wants a rush job you may be able to increase your price. If you are already fully booked or you know a particular client is troublesome, you may want to quote a higher price for that particular client instead of just declining the job.

6) Gifts and discounts are okay for friends and family, but clients should pay a reasonable rate. Do you eventually want to earn a living with your art? Your pricing should be a step toward that goal.

7) Find GOOD clients!
The type of clients that demand low prices are either clients who undervalue your work, clients who have an endless string of failed projects so they can't afford to pay well, or clients who are too poor to be a reasonable source of income for you. Successful clients are willing to pay more for good art and reliability, are more likely to be part of a successful venture, and are more likely to seek you out for more paid work. If you apply for enough jobs, you should be able to connect with enough good clients to keep you busy. As your art skills and marketing skills improve, it will become easier for you to find work.

8) "But I'm not good enough!" If you are REALLY not good enough to sell your art then keep working to improve. Evaluate your skill level objectively, get feedback from ARTISTS on individual pieces (deviation thumbshares forum: forum.deviantart.com/showcase/… is good for that) Don't rely on real life friends and family for critiques. Rely on more experienced artists. Work your butt off, and get better. fav.me/d51wa5n. When you are able to bring in as much work as you can handle, then gradually increase your prices. Continue to look for types of work that clients will pay more for, or get better at your current type of work so that clients will pay more. Pricing can be a bit subjective, so the most important thing is to find a starting point and then re-evaluate from time to time (hopefully increasing each time).

9) "No one is asking to buy my work!" Even if your skill level is good enough, don't expect people to come and find you and ask to pay you (at first). What are you doing to promote yourself? Writing "Commissions are open!" in your signature is not enough. Go find jobs! fav.me/d50vith Learn to pick good jobs and avoid bad ones: fav.me/d4xknxo You have to be your own salesperson.

10) Royalties, Profit Sharing, and "Exposure": Usually jobs that offer these types of payment go exactly NOWHERE and pay you exactly NOTHING. You have been warned. On the other hand, if you have an opportunity to work with a reputable published author, a reputable well known company or organization or a reputable charity, then you might actually get some good experience out of it. Just do your research first and weigh the pros and cons.

11) Contests and Speculative work: Many contests held by individuals or "small companies" are simply scams to get free art or drum up ideas that can be used or combined without payment. Contests held by reputable companies may be worthwile. Do your research before entering contests. As a general rule, I'd recommend not bothering with spec work. If you have free time, practice, study, make something nice to improve your portfolio, or search for paid work.

12) I also don't recommend bothering with deviantart points, bitcoins or any other type of non-money payment. [EDIT deviantart points can now be withdrawn through paypal if you received them using the commission widget. Deviantart keeps 20% of the points earned this way, so I would still recommend money over points as a payment type.]

related link:  'Official' Pricing Your Commissions or Artwork Thread

Hope that helps,
-FH
Add a Comment:
 
:iconkyokochuu12:
KyokoChuu12 Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Wow, thanks for this! I'm going to start commissions soon and this was helpful. The only question I have is, being disabled in my hands, I'm extremely slow compared to other artists. Due to having zero income, I'd have to charge per hour to make a living with all the time consumed. So what normally would take some folks a few hours can take me 2 - 3x as long to accomplish because of my limitations. And so it bothers me that for a 30 hour piece (my average for colored), would be about $262 for where I live. And I feel like because I'm disabled, it would deter people from wanting to commission anything from me, regardless of quality.

I'm so torn because I feel like I SHOULD charge for my time (and surpringly for a disabled person, I can get busy, especially with appointments), but at the same time I feel like it will hurt me...I don't know how to better explain this situation, but yes. And I don't think I should charge a flat fee either because of the fact my speed may fluctuate and can get things done quicker/slower. So I'm not entirely sure whether someone like me should do commission work...

Any advise for someone in my situation?
Reply
:iconmanic-the-hedgehog13:
Manic-the-Hedgehog13 Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
I know you've been asked by a few others to go see their art, but I have my first potential commission looming and I really need your help to decide a price. I typically do my art to entertain myself and never actually thought of it as a means to any sort of end. (Other than the end of my boredom :3 ). Heck I'll take feedback from anyone.
Reply
:iconartifexstudio:
ArtifexStudio Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017  Student General Artist
Hey could u check out my art? I'm not sure what its worth and I dont want to overcharge. I'm not sure if theres a general good number to set for commission points
Reply
:iconwolfspiritlol25:
wolfspiritlol25 Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
and if points go to money or stay points only
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
Google search to the rescue!

commission widget explained: danlev.deviantart.com/journal/…

commission widget points can be withdrawn as Paypal or check: FAQ #372: When do I get paid for my Commission?
Reply
:iconwolfspiritlol25:
wolfspiritlol25 Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
ok thanks
Reply
:iconwolfspiritlol25:
wolfspiritlol25 Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
im only wondering how paypal payment works
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
Hi,
Paypal.com has a help section that explains how their service works with the various types of accounts they offer.
Reply
:icontutucthulhu:
TutuCthulhu Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2017  Student Digital Artist
Most people say to include cost of materials in your price which is great advice, but I'm not sure if/how to do so for digital art. Art programs are awfully expensive and used frequently, so you probably wouldn't add the total program cost onto the commission price. But my question is, how much, if any? Maybe a percentage based on how many commissions you are taking but I'm unsure how I would calculate that. Thanks!
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
In general, with digital art, you do not use up any materials that must be re-purchased or replaced for the next job. I don't recommend charging an additional fee for the HOURLY cost of your software, computer, etc...

(photoshop CC at $9.99 to $29.99 per month is about 1.3 to 4 cents per hour)
(a $1000 computer that last about 4 years is about 2.8 cents per hour)


However, when you get to the point of freelancing for a living, and paying all of your own expenses, you SHOULD look at the big picture and be aware of the total amount of money you need to earn in a year (or a month) in order to pay every expense that you incur during that period.  For example if you can calculate that you need to earn $500 each week then you may have an idea of how many hours you need to work and how much money you must charge per hour in order to break even. Obviously you want to earn more than that break-even amount if possible.
Reply
:iconyuuchipyon:
YuuchiPyon Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Hello. I was wondering in how much would GIF Profile Icons would sell? I'm still a new deviantUser here.

Actually, I'm doing commissions (Not about Arts, but doing commissions about GIF profile icons only). So I was wondering on how much they cost?

Thanks in advance if you replied.
Reply
:iconpinixtheraoguard:
PinixTheRaoGuard Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2017
When I start commissions, my animated icons was for 50 points. Now, they are free because I know that my icons aren't enough good for deserve money. But I think start with 50 points is rather interesting. 
Reply
:iconyuuchipyon:
YuuchiPyon Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well, thank you kind sir for replying :D
Reply
:iconpinixtheraoguard:
PinixTheRaoGuard Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2017
No problem ^^
Reply
:iconhotpocketguru:
hotpocketguru Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2017  Student General Artist
Hello, Could you take a look at my gallery and give me a couple of suggestions? This folder is full of my pencil sketches (hotpocketguru.deviantart.com/g…), which I am considering selling along with digital works found in this folder (hotpocketguru.deviantart.com/g…). I will probably focus more on the paper sketches than the digital art, but I am having trouble coming up with baseline prices. I will probably offer busts, full bodies, and full body colored. I will be pricing them in Points. Thank you!
Reply
:iconpinixtheraoguard:
PinixTheRaoGuard Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2017
Your art is great! Keep it up like this!
Also, I'm not good for pricing, but I think your sketches may cost over 100 points!
Reply
:iconmariosonicanimefan:
Mariosonicanimefan Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Kinda awkward for me on pricing,since my country doesn't actually have a minimum wage,both for locals and foreigners-- The reason being that the increase and decrease of wage should be based on one's hard work,ability,skills,etc etc

Any idea on where to head on towards prices?
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
Hi,
Please read the journal again. As I mentioned, if you are new to freelancing and you don't know what to charge, the exact value is not important. You just need to pick a starting point so that you can try to sell some work and understand the process of freelancing better.  You could use the minimum wage of a nearby country or the minimum wage of the area where your clients live.
Reply
:iconvaansecrets:
vaansecrets Featured By Owner Sep 8, 2016  Hobbyist Writer
Friendly hand, I have a questions for you: How do I price Text comissions? I am starting slowly with art trades but if someone doesn't have the ability to draw anything in trade but has money then I can't help because I want to do fair prices, can you help?
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
Hi,
My thoughts about finding a starting price are described in the journal entry above. The same ideas apply to written commissions. You can probably do a google search if you want to get some ideas about per-word pricing. Sections 2,3,4 and 7 of my journal contain some important things to consider.
Reply
:iconvaansecrets:
vaansecrets Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2016  Hobbyist Writer
I've read it all and will definetly read again (your tutorial is simply too well written), the question I had was really about aspects of pricing it (some writers talked with me and I have a better understanding of what is commonly charged), but I almost forgot: Thank you :D not just for answering but also for writing the journal, I hope you have a good week!
Reply
:iconscrottpot:
ScrottPot Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
I want to have people buy my commissions often. However, many say they are too high. I have only 7 commission options, so it only goes up to 700 points. I would love if you could possibly tell me the best price range for my commissions. Here is the commission journal. Thanks!
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Edited Aug 22, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
Hi,
Your link does not seem to work, your gallery seems to be empty. Your name seems to refer to scrotums and/or pot.  I'm not sure that you are prepared to sell commissions.
Reply
:iconscrottpot:
ScrottPot Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
Oh dear, sorry! After I commented I  deleted stuff and forgot about it all, im so sorry. also, my username does not mean that. I should really change my username, it is supposed to represent a rhyme of scrotty and pot since scrotty is a nickname for me (No, the nickname does not mean scrotums). I am so sorry. I should really get a new account.
Reply
:icontykira:
Tykira Featured By Owner Edited Jul 24, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I'm looking to open commissions. But I live in the UK, so I use the GBP. How should I go about pricing? My problem is that the GBP keeps flunctuating.. so I'm gonna get different prices. Should I list in GBP or USD? Because, say if I opened icons or something for $5, then I'd only get £3 as the current rate for the GBP stands. Any advice? And yes, I'm only going to be taking commissions in money, not points.
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Jul 24, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
If a significant number of your clients will be paying in GBP then GBP would be a good choice.

If you find that USD is more common, then you have options:
1) you could update your pricing frequently to reflect the current conversion rate, but it would be a lot of work for you and it might confuse or frustrate clients.
2) you could post your pricing in GBP and ask clients to choose "pounds sterling" as their payment type on paypal.  (www.paypal.com/us/cgi-bin/webs…) This option does not seem difficult, but it still might confuse some clients so you might end up with 5 USD instead of 5 GBP in some cases.
3) I'm not sure, but I think you could invoice each client with a paypal invoice that explains the pricing is GBP and that paypal will automatically make the conversion to USD.  This option MIGHT prevent payment mistakes but still might confuse the clients. I've never tried it so I'm not sure if it would be foolproof.
4) if the conversion rate keeps fluctuating within a certain predictable range you could pick a USD price that falls somewhere near the middle or top of that range.  This might be the option that is easiest for the clients.
Reply
:iconkeyra-my-kitten:
Keyra-My-Kitten Featured By Owner Jul 7, 2016  Student Digital Artist
Hello,I am a digital artist who draws using a mouse my first ever experience when selling off my art (adopts) kinda not as good as I expected 
The price they bid totally not enough for a 3 hours art,and I found out the deviants doesn't pay much attention toward the art I made but more interested in buying much more simple art or dull colored.. 
I had read everything above but this situation could be happen again I suppose Waaaah!  I'm so confused right now,whether my art is not good enough on market or not getting much attention.Please give advice
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
Hi,
Hello,I am a digital artist who draws using a mouse my first ever experience when selling off my art (adopts) kinda not as good as I expected

 selling art is always difficult at first. you have to figure out what the problems are and then use an appropriate solution. It seems like you already have some good ideas.

The price they bid totally not enough for a 3 hours art,and I found out the deviants doesn't pay much attention toward the art I made but more interested in buying much more simple art or dull colored..

your art does not match your audience. you either need to change your art or find the right audience ( or both)

if you are doing adopt auctions on DA then you are competing against a lot of artists with low prices. Maybe if you find good adopts groups you will have some luck, but adopts are probably not a good way to make money unless you are very skilled with a fan base and a good reputation. 

look at the job offers here or on other sites. figure out what people are willing to pay for, and choose jobs that are a good fit. Try to choose things that you do better than your competitors or work on your skills until you are better than your competitors.

Be sure to search for jobs and bid on jobs. Artists who are starting out are not likely to get attention automatically.

Lots of other tips in my other journal entries.
Good luck!
Reply
:iconkeyra-my-kitten:
Keyra-My-Kitten Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2016  Student Digital Artist
I'm really impressed! You really motivates me to do arts after I had planned to quit like I did 2 years ago yesterday,
"But let's wait for any replies" and I am so happy to know about this and to seek for advice from a pro.
However,I joined about 2 adopt groups where their arts get attentions in just some minutes.I made an observation toward the arts and I kinda be like "Her arts worth about 2$ and it's so skilled but why there's none interested? Besides,it's so cheap" and I checked out another art which can be done in less than a hour Sold in just some minutes(Hope you get my point)

Another question,
Do you think I should just fix a price for my adopt?
And thank you so much for helping me back into Arts!
Reply
:iconcartoonlovergrl2000:
CartoonLoverGrl2000 Featured By Owner May 5, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Hi,
I'm an artist who loves to draw fan art, but I thought about working on commissions with original characters only. The info you've given is really helpful ^^
But the problem is: how the DA currency works. To me, trying to get points is hard; I know that 80 points= $1, which apparently meant that my early pricing (30 points) are worth pennies when I spent a quarter-to-several hours on a piece.
I don't want to sound greedy, but it's just no matter how much effort I put into my works, caring about price didn't actually bother me, but recently, it's starting to get to me...
I have dreamt of becoming an animator, and I know that it's never going to be easy. But I know that nothing is ever too easy, and that we should do our best and what we're most comfortable with ^^
But I'm guessing that I couldn't be ready for commissions, even if it was thought about- I wanted to create a portfolio, improve my work and most of all make people happy. So that's why I do requests most of the time.
But sometimes I get really insecure of what people think of me on starting commissions.
I wish I had the confidence :,(
Any advice on how to be prepared for commissions rather than pricing and advertising?
Thank you,
Jenny
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Edited May 5, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
Hi,

My specific advice for you is "fake it until you make it" which, in this case, means you need to imagine how you want to be as a freelance artist (professional, polite and confident), and then pretend to be that way in all of your business dealings until your real confidence actually catches up.

Requests are good practice. They aren't hurting you, especially if you are in a position where you do not have to pay your own rent or other bills yet. Transitioning completely to paid work is probably the goal at this stage.

You can start trying to get commissions even if you are not sure you are ready. applying for jobs is good practice. You may get some useful feedback and you may get some criticisms, but it will all help you learn about communication and what to expect from different types of clients. Don't worry about getting turned down a little or a lot. After a while neither you nor the clients will remember that you applied for this little job or that one.

Applying for jobs or reading job offers may help give you a better idea of what types of things to add to your portfolio like animation samples. Also don't be afraid to remove things that are unfinished or things that are your least impressive works.

If you pursue animation, that will give you skills many other artists do not have, which means you will have less competition for certain jobs and you can probably charge more for your art. Even if you start with small animated gifs of characters blinking or wagging their tails, that type of specialty skill will help set you apart from the many many artists who only do static images.

Hope that helps!
Reply
:iconnotori0us7:
Notori0us7 Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2016  Student Digital Artist
is five dollars okay? I mean my art style is mediocre but I just wanna know if $ 5 is too high or too low.
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
Hi
You didn't even give me any idea what you are trying to price. Basically you are saying "I want to sell something, and I won't tell you what it is, but it is probably art related...  is $5 a good price?"

But also, please read the whole journal entry...You might have skipped some parts of the article, in which I discuss how to choose a minimum starting price... whether or not to worry about choosing the exact "right" price...and what variables you should think about if your art is not selling for that price.
Reply
:iconsuspicioustv:
SuspiciousTv Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Alright...
I'm making ponies art. No bases. I want to sell one commision for 10 points... For now. I don't want to make too big price... You know. BUT, I want to sell two types - Paint Tool SAI art (cheaper) and Artweaver art (more expensive). You can find my art on my profile. Can you help me?
Hope you'll answer.
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Edited Apr 12, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
Hi,
You might have skipped some parts of the article, in which I discuss how to choose a minimum starting price, whether or not to accept points, and what to do if your art is not selling.

It might seem like a lot to read, but I would suggest reading the whole thing and trying to understand each part. There are parts explaining different reasons why you might have difficulty selling your work, and what you might do about that.

Then if you still want to charge 10 cents worth of points, you can make that choice.

Good luck!
Reply
:iconanimelover55:
Animelover55 Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
I... got so confused after reading this. It was so detailed! What is the base amount you would say for me to use? 8 dollars? 10? I use both paint, color pencils, and paintsai as my drawing styles. 

Also if you use devientart points can you convert that to money or no? 
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
It might be easier if you focus on one section at a time instead of the whole big thing.

My suggestion for a minimum starting price is discussed in the section titled "Find a starting price" It is based on the amount of time your work on the art and the minimum hourly wage in your area.

My opinion about points is in the last sentence of the journal entry
Reply
:iconarisaxkureno:
arisaxkureno Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2016   General Artist
i mostly do pixels and on one of them i charge 150 :points: 
my problem is that im selling the base as a P2U and im not sure what price to set it as
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
Hi
I would need more information to even offer a suggestion (beyond what is written in the journal):
1) are they selling? how many have you sold at that price?
2) is it worth your time to sell them for that price?
3) do you know how much money that is?
4) did you read my opinion about points in the journal?
5) Are "pixels" and "base" referring to exactly the same thing and you want to know if the price is okay... or are you selling the pixels for one price and the base is a simplified version that you want to sell for a different price?
Reply
:iconarisaxkureno:
arisaxkureno Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2016   General Artist
1) yes and 5 so far
2) yes they are
3) yes i do
4) yes i have
5) i am selling the pixels for one price and the simplified version i would like to sell for a different price
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Edited Feb 8, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
When your prices are that low and in points, you are already disregarding most of what I discuss in my journal, and maybe the exact price isn't as important as just selling things for fun.  In general, I'd say that the base price could be about 50% of the pixel art price, but you didn't provide a specific example so that's just a rough guess.

My advice is, if you are doing it for fun don't worry about the exact pricing. If you are doing it for money, then you can probably set a goal to increase your pricing. Think about how you can charge more by:
1) simply increasing the price if people will pay more
2) charging money instead of points or offering money AND points pricing with the point pricing a little higher.
3) seeking out clients with more money (possibly on other sites where there is less competition from other artists)
4) offering something slightly different that will appeal to clients with more money.

This is just an example of one thing you could consider trying:
If you can do a pixel art of a cat for the same amount to effort as your 150 point pixel art, you might be able to sell them for $3.00 or $5.00 or more on a cat lovers forum. color the pixel cats to match photos of the members' real cats. Much less competition on a cat forum than on DA.

Or you might be able to make more money creating pixel art for video games but I don't have much experience with that. I think it would be more about low prices and large quantities.

Hope that helps,
-FH
Reply
:iconarisaxkureno:
arisaxkureno Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2016   General Artist
alright! thank you

(sorry my reply isnt long)
Reply
:iconshauna-random:
shauna-random Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2016
how do you physically change the price of the artwork because mine was set way too expensive
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
if you are referring to deviantart prints, you have to have a core (paying) membership to change your prices.

FAQ #122: Is there a maximum/minimum selling price?
Reply
:iconbrushfox:
BrushFox Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
In terms with "price according to materials" What about digital art?
Reply
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