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Hi,
If you spend a lot of time in the DA forums, you will see this topic spring up again and again. Whether you want to earn a living doing freelance art, or you just want to do an occasional commission, the following guidelines may help you. For the purposes of this journal I'm going to assume that you developed sufficient skill for potential clients to want to purchase your work. If that is not the case, then get back to studying and practicing :)

1) Why is it so difficult to choose a price? Why can't someone look at my art and tell me what to charge? Because your ability to sell something is not just a matter of assigning a price based on your skill level! If three people can draw the same drawing with the same level of skill, one might be able to sell the art for $10, another might be able to sell the art for $100 and the third might not be able to sell it at all depending on how good they are at "marketing" (seeking out or attracting the best clients and convincing them to buy from you). An artist's ability to seek out clients, choose the right clients, offer a type of work that will sell for a good price, communicate effectively, and provide value that their competitors cannot match... is difficult to gauge by looking at a few art samples.

2) The starting price you pick right now doesn't have to be the perfect price. You can change it in a week or a month. The important thing is to get started with the process of selling your art. Sell some art then re-evaluate your prices. If art is going to be a career for you, through trial, error, research and skill building, you will probably want to figure out the highest reasonable amount you can charge while still providing a good value to the client so that you get more business.

3)
As an artist, you will find that you can increase your prices if you:
3a) improve your art skills
3b) improve your gallery or portfolio
3c) find clients who are willing to spend more than other clients
3d) improve your ability to convince more clients to buy from you instead of someone else.
3e) offer a product or service that is of a higher quality, harder to find, or of more importance or value to potential clients so you can increase your prices
3f) learn to pick reliable clients who pay promptly and don't require a lot of revisions
3g) clearly describe the work you will provide and then deliver it on time
3h) develop a reputation as someone who is professional, pleasant, reliable and easy to work with
3i) consistently attract enough clients that it won't matter if you lose a few when your prices go up.



4) "Find a starting price"
(Very experienced artists may be able to charge a lot more than beginners because of their skill level, notoriety, or other factors)
For anyone new to freelancing (again assuming that your art is good enough to attract clients), a pretty common way to estimate your price for a piece of art is to pick an hourly rate and multiply that by the (approximate) number of hours that it will take you to complete the art. The number of hours you estimate for the work may just be rough guess, but you will get better at approximating as you complete more and more work. If you are just starting out with freelancing, and you plan to eventually earn a living with art, you should charge at least minimum wage. (Otherwise you might as well get a regular job that doesn't require any special skills!)  If you are selling art online or to clients in a particular part of the world, you can probably use the minimum wage rate where the client lives as a starting point (or you can use the minimum wage in your area of the world, or average the two values...). If you KNOW you can charge more than that, do it. Also include the value of any materials used up in the process and the shipping cost if you are mailing a physical piece of art to a client. You can get approximate mailing prices by visiting the website of your post office (in the USA it is postcalc.usps.com/ ).

As I said before, it is not important to figure the exact "right" starting price. You just need to estimate a price, and start trying to sell your work, then adjust your price or your skill level or your selling methods, to find a combination that works for you.

If you can't get people to pay at least "minimum wage" , don't just keep lowering your prices toward zero... instead, improve your art skills and job seeking behaviors to accommodate a reasonable price.
4a) improve your art skills,
4b) improve the appearance of your portfolio/profile,
4c) improve the way you find and apply for jobs,
4d) seek better clients or possibly
4e) provide a different type of art that has less competition or a higher demand.
The more you work, the more you will build up the confidence to insist on a decent pay rate. If you are pretty good, and you work hard, and learn to market yourself, then at some point you will have more job offers than you can handle.

5) Increasing your prices!
If you are able to bring as much work as you can handle, you may be able to increase your price. If you are well known, you may be able to increase your price. If you have very little competition for a particular job, you may be able to increase your price. If you are more skilled than your competition you may be able to increase your price. If your client wants a rush job you may be able to increase your price. If you are already fully booked or you know a particular client is troublesome, you may want to quote a higher price for that particular client instead of just declining the job.

6) Gifts and discounts are okay for friends and family, but clients should pay a reasonable rate. Do you eventually want to earn a living with your art? Your pricing should be a step toward that goal.

7) Find GOOD clients!
The type of clients that demand low prices are either clients who undervalue your work, clients who have an endless string of failed projects so they can't afford to pay well, or clients who are too poor to be a reasonable source of income for you. Successful clients are willing to pay more for good art and reliability, are more likely to be part of a successful venture, and are more likely to seek you out for more paid work. If you apply for enough jobs, you should be able to connect with enough good clients to keep you busy. As your art skills and marketing skills improve, it will become easier for you to find work.

8) "But I'm not good enough!" If you are REALLY not good enough to sell your art then keep working to improve. Evaluate your skill level objectively, get feedback from ARTISTS on individual pieces (deviation thumbshares forum: forum.deviantart.com/showcase/… is good for that) Don't rely on real life friends and family for critiques. Rely on more experienced artists. Work your butt off, and get better. fav.me/d51wa5n. When you are able to bring in as much work as you can handle, then gradually increase your prices. Continue to look for types of work that clients will pay more for, or get better at your current type of work so that clients will pay more. Pricing can be a bit subjective, so the most important thing is to find a starting point and then re-evaluate from time to time (hopefully increasing each time).

9) "No one is asking to buy my work!" Even if your skill level is good enough, don't expect people to come and find you and ask to pay you (at first). What are you doing to promote yourself? Writing "Commissions are open!" in your signature is not enough. Go find jobs! fav.me/d50vith Learn to pick good jobs and avoid bad ones: fav.me/d4xknxo You have to be your own salesperson.

10) Royalties, Profit Sharing, and "Exposure": Usually jobs that offer these types of payment go exactly NOWHERE and pay you exactly NOTHING. You have been warned. On the other hand, if you have an opportunity to work with a reputable published author, a reputable well known company or organization or a reputable charity, then you might actually get some good experience out of it. Just do your research first and weigh the pros and cons.

11) Contests and Speculative work: Many contests held by individuals or "small companies" are simply scams to get free art or drum up ideas that can be used or combined without payment. Contests held by reputable companies may be worthwile. Do your research before entering contests. As a general rule, I'd recommend not bothering with spec work. If you have free time, practice, study, make something nice to improve your portfolio, or search for paid work.

12) I also don't recommend bothering with deviantart points, bitcoins or any other type of non-money payment. [EDIT deviantart points can now be withdrawn through paypal if you received them using the commission widget. Deviantart keeps 20% of the points earned this way, so I would still recommend money over points as a payment type.]

related link:  'Official' Pricing Your Commissions or Artwork Thread

Hope that helps,
-FH
Add a Comment:
 
:icondrthumt:
Drthumt Featured By Owner Jul 21, 2017  New Deviant Hobbyist Digital Artist
I actually don't know how I should prize my stuff since i really don't think I'm good enough, but how much would you pay for my actually completed stuff. I really want to try doing commision but i don't know where to start :( (Sad)  
Reply
:iconvanillalina:
VanillAlina Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Hello, I'm planning on starting art commissions but I didn't know how to price it, did a search for how to price my art and saw this post. Can anyone help me get a rough idea on how much I should price my art? :o
Reply
:icontogekii:
togekii Featured By Owner Edited Jul 11, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
nya! by togekii would anyone be able to judge how much i should price my commissions? i spent about 5 hours on it. currently, they are at 10$ but i might be underpricing them.. the thing is, my audience is all little kids with no money haha 
Reply
:icon666lava:
666lava Featured By Owner 2 days ago
id personally pay nothing less than 15-20+ dollars for that? but i totally understand underpricing because of audience, it sucks
Reply
:icontogekii:
togekii Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist Digital Artist
yeah haha, well thanks for replying! i think i found the style and prices that work best for me right now : D
Reply
:icontrishagaile:
trishagaile Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2017
hello , can you look.into my artworks, and judge what price should be suited to my level
Reply
:iconbigsistersplash:
BigSisterSplash Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Hi there! i'm also looking for help on it
I'm looking into opening commissions for the first time but Im really worried about pricing as im in GPB and most people use USD (Take about 5-6 dollars off) which I think would put A LOT of people off
I was wondering if anyone would be kind enough to help me with pricing, the last people I asked were quite rude, Telling me I should be charging less than £5 for a full body piece which hey My arts not the best but I thought that was was kind of insulting.
Reply
:icontogekii:
togekii Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
a flat color of yours would probably sell around 12$, however, once you develop a good audience you could be pricing them at $20+!
Reply
:iconbigsistersplash:
BigSisterSplash Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you for replying.
I've been planning on charging about £10-£15 for starters based on character complexity because I draw a lot of peoples monster/alien chars.

Thats about $12-$19 which will put off people at first I guess but I dont think I can charge people less than £10(GBP) for my art it seems unfair to myself.
Reply
:icontogekii:
togekii Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
what i normally do, (its easier if you have the mobile app) is i copy the link to my commissions page, and then go to the deviant search bar and search 'lf commissions' or 'lf art' or 'looking for commissions"... etc and go to the category and click journals, and change 'whats hottest' to 'newest'. that way you can s ee all the people who are looking for art of their characters, and advertise your commissions to them! just make sure the journal isn't too old though haha
Reply
:iconbigsistersplash:
BigSisterSplash Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Ooh I'll remember that thank you very much!!

I'm just gonna start by offering it to my watchers and followers on tumblr etc, which I guess for now is less intimidating to me than complete strangers.
I've worked myself up into a bit of a nervous tizzy because its the first time i've done this.
Reply
:icontogekii:
togekii Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
aw, well its good youre starting to offer up commissions, and you'll get the hang of it soon!
Reply
:iconbigsistersplash:
BigSisterSplash Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you!
Thanks for all your help!!
Reply
:icontogekii:
togekii Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
np~
Reply
:iconangelic-kitsune:
Angelic-Kitsune Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Hello, everyone. I'm curious as to how much my drawings would be worth if I were to sell them.

I very rarely color them, and they're mostly solid line art.

Would it also make sense to charge money based on style? My cartoony/pseudo-anime style takes much less time to draw than my full-on anime style.
Reply
:iconcerberosz:
Cerberosz Featured By Owner May 24, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Could you (anyone) look at some of my recent drawings and tell me around how much could I ask for? I don't want to underprice, because a lot of effort went into them, but I also don't want to overprice bc what if no one wants to pay so much 🐷
Reply
:iconeggsona:
eggsona Featured By Owner May 25, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
in regards to "overprice" and "not wanting to pay so much":
be warey of those who might come to you (even once you put up commission listings/information) and complaining how you should be pricing lower!! I've seen on twitter lately a lot of great artists (with same skill level ish as you) having to deal with shitty people who are rude and think 10 hour pieces should be $10. (that's $1 an hour................................. not at all livable or even as part time, not profitable!)

I noticed you put some prices up but your work is worth SO much more! ;o; Like this:
  Dolly | My OC by Senikka  
Not even looking at hours you put into it, I'd put at minimum $70. The details you put in and realism yet unique style you have (+ different atmospheres like this is cute cozy), but ESPECIALLY the details!! I'd honestly price this at $100 and have been revising the "minimum" suggested price while writing this, because every time I look at this again, there's even more careful little yet wonderful touches to the overall character. (the different piercings, her eyes, the fact that the horns are textured, the "fly-away" hairs, etc.). In my opinion, it's better to "overprice" at first and then move it a LITTLE down, rather than to underprice, then people expect the same quality of work and may even ask for cheaper (those same shitty people I first mentioned).
$100 would also fit with the ~13hours at least done with this work (depending on what minimum wage is in your area). 

I notice you're from Hungary, so minimum wage there is similar to Czech Republic (parents + entire family from there). Art, especially this, is considered skilled labor.
Wikipedia says as of 1/2017 minimum wage there is now " 161,250 HUF (€535; $560)" a month for skilled work......... which is really little when looking at hourly charts. Like in the US, federal minimum wage is $7.25 (ignoring what individual states set as their amount like in my state it's $10) which converts to 1989.83 HUF (6.47 Euros) per hour. 

Depending on what you plan to do, if you plan to actually use money for something substantial, I'd go absolutely no lower than $90 for this! It may seem really expensive............ But holy shit, this is really really nice. You do some smaller things like your current icon, so maybe if you'd want to do smaller things to have some lower price options for people. That way they can also have a feel for your work and determine if they want to commission you for something larger!

((sorry for this huge comment, but your work is SEVERELY underpriced right now!))
Reply
:iconcerberosz:
Cerberosz Featured By Owner May 26, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Wow Thank you so much for this. I will rewrite my commission prices then ? I still can't price them $100 that just seems like a huge amount of money, and I don't think my drawings are THAT good haha. And I know that $10 is underpriced, but seeing others having their commissions starting from $3 really threw me off, and because I have very little amount of drawings, thus really low page views, new people don't really come by often, and those who do still don't want to buy.. I guess I just have to be patient and determined? Make as much drawings as I can and hope that someday hard work will pay off. Thank you again for the comment I really appreciate it xx♥
Reply
:iconeggsona:
eggsona Featured By Owner May 26, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
In regards to catching attention - usually doing some fanart grabs a lot of attention to your profile!
also, I noticed you have instagram but do you have a twitter or tumblr? :0 (small warning: tumblr can be pretty broken at times :/ )
it can help boost attention @ you more too (you can be paid with paypal for people w/o deviantart accounts), especially if you do some occasional fanart since those sites let people share easier (also makes less chance of people reposting your work w/o credit, since you'll have those accounts for people to share from directly!) Twitter feels more casual in my opinion so you could post even doodles/sketches! That way people see more of your drawings, even if its very very casual/for fun.

;v; I feel you about feeling thrown off by how low some people have their commissions... I've been debating about starting commissions myself (but also have not that much "finished" work) and years of seeing those low prices has me uneasy :(

But as FriendlyHand wrote in #7, GOOD clients are important! There will always be those who try to rip-off younger inexperienced (with commissions) artists or get really angry at artists for not letting them pay just $5 for a $40 piece of art.

On twitter couple days ago there was this person yelling at an artist, "well USUALLY commissions are for charity so you should price cheaper!" This artist were having a "flash sale" and lowering their prices by 10% so they could buy a new cell phone (old one cracked + totally unusable) :/ also that same yelling person obviously didn't know what they were talking about because a lot of artists do commission to make money to live....
Reply
:iconkyokochuu12:
KyokoChuu12 Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Wow, thanks for this! I'm going to start commissions soon and this was helpful. The only question I have is, being disabled in my hands, I'm extremely slow compared to other artists. Due to having zero income, I'd have to charge per hour to make a living with all the time consumed. So what normally would take some folks a few hours can take me 2 - 3x as long to accomplish because of my limitations. And so it bothers me that for a 30 hour piece (my average for colored), would be about $262 for where I live. And I feel like because I'm disabled, it would deter people from wanting to commission anything from me, regardless of quality.

I'm so torn because I feel like I SHOULD charge for my time (and surpringly for a disabled person, I can get busy, especially with appointments), but at the same time I feel like it will hurt me...I don't know how to better explain this situation, but yes. And I don't think I should charge a flat fee either because of the fact my speed may fluctuate and can get things done quicker/slower. So I'm not entirely sure whether someone like me should do commission work...

Any advise for someone in my situation?
Reply
:iconowlquoise:
owlquoise Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Dude I know that feeling... I have the same problem too. I'm broke it takes me awhile to finish and my time is limited. I can't afford $10 - $20 per commission. Its anarchy!
Reply
:iconkyokochuu12:
KyokoChuu12 Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Exactly! It was hard for me to figure out because I take extraordinary amounts of time to work because of my hands. I finally settled on a flat fee I can live with until my hands have more strength in them. I hope you figure out something, as well! : (
Reply
:iconowlquoise:
owlquoise Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
From what I've heard so far is that: a fan base is crucial in order for you to name your price. So... Work hard and fanart. Or do NSFWs..... (͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
Reply
:iconkyokochuu12:
KyokoChuu12 Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I've been away from this site so long I don't know how many of my fans are still around. But you're definitely right. I would do NSWF but I live at home with parents who walk in any time they like, so it's out of the question. 

Thanks!
Reply
:iconowlquoise:
owlquoise Featured By Owner May 1, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes. I had an old account on here when I was making fanarts. Things sure do change.
Regarding the NSFWs...
Yes my ma is like: go for it!
My dad: (ノಠ益ಠ)ノ彡┻━┻
Reply
:iconkyokochuu12:
KyokoChuu12 Featured By Owner May 5, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Haha! Both my parents are conservative religious people, would never fly. I am not allowed to curse around them, anything...!

Ah yes, I'd get comments from fan communities on stuff I didn't think was terribly brilliant. Gotta love 'em. : )
Reply
:iconowlquoise:
owlquoise Featured By Owner May 5, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
And like everything else in life, ill do what I want~
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconmanic-the-hedgehog13:
Manic-the-Hedgehog13 Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
I know you've been asked by a few others to go see their art, but I have my first potential commission looming and I really need your help to decide a price. I typically do my art to entertain myself and never actually thought of it as a means to any sort of end. (Other than the end of my boredom :3 ). Heck I'll take feedback from anyone.
Reply
:iconartifexstudio:
ArtifexStudio Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017  Student General Artist
Hey could u check out my art? I'm not sure what its worth and I dont want to overcharge. I'm not sure if theres a general good number to set for commission points
Reply
:iconwolfspiritlol25:
wolfspiritlol25 Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
and if points go to money or stay points only
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
Google search to the rescue!

commission widget explained: danlev.deviantart.com/journal/…

commission widget points can be withdrawn as Paypal or check: FAQ #372: When do I get paid for my Commission?
Reply
:iconwolfspiritlol25:
wolfspiritlol25 Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
ok thanks
Reply
:iconwolfspiritlol25:
wolfspiritlol25 Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
im only wondering how paypal payment works
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
Hi,
Paypal.com has a help section that explains how their service works with the various types of accounts they offer.
Reply
:icontutucthulhu:
TutuCthulhu Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2017  Student Digital Artist
Most people say to include cost of materials in your price which is great advice, but I'm not sure if/how to do so for digital art. Art programs are awfully expensive and used frequently, so you probably wouldn't add the total program cost onto the commission price. But my question is, how much, if any? Maybe a percentage based on how many commissions you are taking but I'm unsure how I would calculate that. Thanks!
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
In general, with digital art, you do not use up any materials that must be re-purchased or replaced for the next job. I don't recommend charging an additional fee for the HOURLY cost of your software, computer, etc...

(photoshop CC at $9.99 to $29.99 per month is about 1.3 to 4 cents per hour)
(a $1000 computer that last about 4 years is about 2.8 cents per hour)


However, when you get to the point of freelancing for a living, and paying all of your own expenses, you SHOULD look at the big picture and be aware of the total amount of money you need to earn in a year (or a month) in order to pay every expense that you incur during that period.  For example if you can calculate that you need to earn $500 each week then you may have an idea of how many hours you need to work and how much money you must charge per hour in order to break even. Obviously you want to earn more than that break-even amount if possible.
Reply
:iconyuuchipyon:
YuuchiPyon Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Hello. I was wondering in how much would GIF Profile Icons would sell? I'm still a new deviantUser here.

Actually, I'm doing commissions (Not about Arts, but doing commissions about GIF profile icons only). So I was wondering on how much they cost?

Thanks in advance if you replied.
Reply
:iconpinixtheraoguard:
PinixTheRaoGuard Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2017
When I start commissions, my animated icons was for 50 points. Now, they are free because I know that my icons aren't enough good for deserve money. But I think start with 50 points is rather interesting. 
Reply
:iconyuuchipyon:
YuuchiPyon Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well, thank you kind sir for replying :D
Reply
:iconpinixtheraoguard:
PinixTheRaoGuard Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2017
No problem ^^
Reply
:iconhotpocketguru:
hotpocketguru Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2017  Student General Artist
Hello, Could you take a look at my gallery and give me a couple of suggestions? This folder is full of my pencil sketches (hotpocketguru.deviantart.com/g…), which I am considering selling along with digital works found in this folder (hotpocketguru.deviantart.com/g…). I will probably focus more on the paper sketches than the digital art, but I am having trouble coming up with baseline prices. I will probably offer busts, full bodies, and full body colored. I will be pricing them in Points. Thank you!
Reply
:iconpinixtheraoguard:
PinixTheRaoGuard Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2017
Your art is great! Keep it up like this!
Also, I'm not good for pricing, but I think your sketches may cost over 100 points!
Reply
:iconmariosonicanimefan:
Mariosonicanimefan Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Kinda awkward for me on pricing,since my country doesn't actually have a minimum wage,both for locals and foreigners-- The reason being that the increase and decrease of wage should be based on one's hard work,ability,skills,etc etc

Any idea on where to head on towards prices?
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
Hi,
Please read the journal again. As I mentioned, if you are new to freelancing and you don't know what to charge, the exact value is not important. You just need to pick a starting point so that you can try to sell some work and understand the process of freelancing better.  You could use the minimum wage of a nearby country or the minimum wage of the area where your clients live.
Reply
:iconvaansecrets:
vaansecrets Featured By Owner Sep 8, 2016  Hobbyist Writer
Friendly hand, I have a questions for you: How do I price Text comissions? I am starting slowly with art trades but if someone doesn't have the ability to draw anything in trade but has money then I can't help because I want to do fair prices, can you help?
Reply
:iconfriendlyhand:
FriendlyHand Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
Hi,
My thoughts about finding a starting price are described in the journal entry above. The same ideas apply to written commissions. You can probably do a google search if you want to get some ideas about per-word pricing. Sections 2,3,4 and 7 of my journal contain some important things to consider.
Reply
:iconvaansecrets:
vaansecrets Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2016  Hobbyist Writer
I've read it all and will definetly read again (your tutorial is simply too well written), the question I had was really about aspects of pricing it (some writers talked with me and I have a better understanding of what is commonly charged), but I almost forgot: Thank you :D not just for answering but also for writing the journal, I hope you have a good week!
Reply
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